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Title Do learning communities matter? [electronic resource] : an examination of the retention of at-risk African American students at an urban, commuter, research university / by Cheryl Deon Newton White.
Publication Info. 2015.

Location Call No. Status Notes
 Electronic Theses and Dissertations  Electronic Resource - WSU ETD    AVAIL. ONLINE
Description 133 p. : ill.
Note Advisor: Monte Piliawsky.
Thesis Thesis (Ed.D.)--Wayne State University, 2015.
Summary The effectiveness of learning community participation on the retention of at-risk, African American students at a public, urban, primarily commuter, research institution was the focus of this research. A nonexperimental, retrospective, descriptive, cohort research design was used with a sample of 318 first time in any college (FTIAC) African American students enrolled in the Alternative Admission Division (AAD) of Metropolitan Urban University (MUU) starting in the fall 2006 semester. The primary research hypothesis was that African American students who were admitted into the AAD at MUU in the fall 2006 semester would have greater academic outcomes (e.g. grade point average and credit hours earned) and persistence (retention and graduation rates) in a six-year period than African American AAD students who did not participate in a learning community in the fall 2006 semester. Three research questions were used to test the hypothesis: 1. Among alternative admissions college students, is there a difference in the six-year retention rates for students who participated in learning communities as compared to students who did not participate in a learning community? 2. Among alternative admissions college students, is there a difference in the number of credit hours earned for students who participated in learning communities as compared to students who did not participate in a learning community? 3. Among alternative admissions college students, is there a difference in cumulative GPA for students who participated in learning communities as compared to students who did not participate in a learning community? Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. The results of the descriptive statistics did not indicate any statistically significant differences between the two groups. Independent sample t-tests were used to examine the research questions.
Based on the research results, there were no statistically significant differences between students who participated in learning communities and those who did not. Additional research on the effect of learning communities on student retention for African American, FTIAC, at-risk, students at MUU is warranted.
Subject Education, Higher.
Multicultural education.
African-American students.
Commuting college students.
Student assistance programs.
College dropouts.
Added Title Wayne State University thesis (Ed. D.) : Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.
OCLC # 929985888
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